Bosnia and Herzegovina Arts and Music

Bosnia and Herzegovina Arts and Music

CULTURE: ART

Although some traces of a penetration of Western architectural forms can be identified, of which the most significant example is the Benedictine basilica of Trebinje, a significant Christian monumental architecture did not develop in the medieval period in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Starting from the sec. XII instead the Bogomila religion, of Manichean inspiration, established itself in the region, giving life to an autochthonous artistic expression of extraordinary originality. Of particular interest in this regard are the reliefs that adorn the steles and sarcophagi of the Bogomile necropolis, of Radimlje and Boljuni in particular, with geometric designs and scenes of everyday life.

According to globalsciencellc, there are also very valuable illuminated manuscripts on parchment from the Bogomila civilization. § Since the end of the century XV the region fell under Turkish rule and remained there until 1878. Of these four centuries, important examples of civil construction remain, such as markets, baths and bridges, large mosques, among which Begova Džamija and Ali Pašma Džamja a Sarajevo, and Ferhadija Džamija in Banja Luka. § In the course of the conflict that from 1992 to 1995 bloodied Bosnia and Herzegovina proclaimed itself an independent Republic, the enormous loss of life was accompanied by the destruction of irreplaceable monuments and works of art, as happened with the bombing of the old city of Sarajevo or the destruction of the ancient Turkish bridge in Mostar. After the end of the conflict, despite the precarious conditions of the life of peace, in Sarajevo, once a cultured and culturally eventful city, a certain avant-garde artistic activity has resumed, which has put the artists of the younger generations in contact with the international scenario. This relationship between Sarajevo, Bosnia and contemporary art did not stop even with the choice, by some of these artists, of a voluntary exile in other European nations. Among the most recent names should be remembered Anur (b. 1971), who defines himself as “a communication operator”, invited to represent Bosnia and Herzegovina at the 49th despite the precarious conditions of the life of peace, in Sarajevo, once a cultured and culturally eventful city, a certain avant-garde artistic activity has resumed, which has put the artists of the younger generations in contact with the international scene. This relationship between Sarajevo, Bosnia and contemporary art did not stop even with the choice, by some of these artists, of a voluntary exile in other European nations. Among the most recent names should be remembered Anur (b. 1971), who defines himself as “a communication operator”, invited to represent Bosnia and Herzegovina at the 49th despite the precarious conditions of the life of peace, in Sarajevo, once a cultured and culturally eventful city, a certain avant-garde artistic activity has resumed, which has put the artists of the younger generations in contact with the international scene.

This relationship between Sarajevo, Bosnia and contemporary art did not stop even with the choice, by some of these artists, of a voluntary exile in other European nations. Among the most recent names should be remembered Anur (b. 1971), who defines himself as “a communication operator”, invited to represent Bosnia and Herzegovina at the 49th which put the artists of the younger generations in contact with the international scene. This relationship between Sarajevo, Bosnia and contemporary art did not stop even with the choice, by some of these artists, of a voluntary exile in other European nations. Among the most recent names should be remembered Anur (b. 1971), who defines himself as “a communication operator”, invited to represent Bosnia and Herzegovina at the 49th which put the artists of the younger generations in contact with the international scene. This relationship between Sarajevo, Bosnia and contemporary art did not stop even with the choice, by some of these artists, of a voluntary exile in other European nations. Among the most recent names should be remembered Anur (b. 1971), who defines himself as “a communication operator”, invited to represent Bosnia and Herzegovina at the 49th Venice Biennale, and the video-artists Sejla Kamerić (b. 1976) and Edina Husanović (b. 1975).

CULTURE: MUSIC

Cultured music found its place of diffusion above all in Catholic churches and mosques; musician of some importance was F. Bosanac (Franciscus Bossinensis), active in the century. XVI. The Austrian occupation of 1878 led to an improvement in musical life. The first concert was held in Sarajevo in 1881 and the first music school was opened in 1900. The National Theater was built in Banja Luka in 1930 and the Sarajevo Opera was founded in 1946; from it, two years later, the Philharmonic Orchestra was born. The musical and musicological training has its fulcrum in the Music Academy, founded in 1955. Among the contemporary composers we remember J. Majer (1888-1965) and J. Pleciti (1901-1961). § The characteristic folk song is ojkanje (lament), also widespread in Croatia and other neighboring regions; it consists of a 2-part song with alternating trills. Muslim populations sing songs reserved for men only, which are also widespread in cities, where they were once performed in public gatherings with accordion accompaniment. In Bosnia and Herzegovina, especially in rural areas, traditional folk music such as sevdalinka is still widely listened to and widespread., a vocal genre with firsharmonic accompaniment or a few other instruments, which has been strongly influenced by Turkish music: among the performers are Safet Isović (b.1936) and Himzo Polovina (1927-1986), a psychiatrist who is was among the most acclaimed performers of this genre of popular songs. Even the musical tradition has suffered the repercussions of the civil war, and currently listening to the sevdalinka it is limited to the older and non-urbanized generations. From 1960 to the early 1990s, the capital was the epicenter of the so-called “Sarajevo pop-rock school”, which started the spread of rock throughout the territory of Yugoslavia. Only with the end of the war did Bosnian music production appear on the international scene, mainly thanks to the films of Emir Kusturica, who used the musician Goran Bregović (b.1950), star for the soundtracks of his works. of Yugoslav rock as early as the seventies. Bregović’s music mixes the rhythms of Gypsy brass, popular polyphony of Bulgarian origin with elements of international rock. Equally known in Bosnia and Herzegovina, the band Zabranjeno pušenje, who in the Eighties began to mix garage rock with traditional folk sounds and rhythms; after the war, with the name of No smoking Orchestra part of the band recorded the soundtrack of the film by Kusturica Black cat, white cat.

Bosnia and Herzegovina Arts and Music