Oregon Baker County Public Libraries

By | January 1, 2023

We are providing a comprehensive directory of public libraries in Baker County, Oregon. This list includes library formal name, street address, postal code, phone number and how many books are available. Check the following list to see all public libraries in Oregon Baker County.

  • Indexdotcom: Brief history of Oregon. Also includes main cities and resorts of the state.
  • ABLOGTOPHONE.COM: Basic information about Oregon, covering the state history, population, geography and economy.

1. Central Library BAKER COUNTY LIBRARY DISTRICT
2400 Resort St, Baker City, OR 97814
Phone Number: (541) 523-6419 Baker N/A N/A

2. Library System BAKER COUNTY LIBRARY DISTRICT
2400 Resort St, Baker City, OR 97814
Phone Number: (541) 523-6419 Baker 138,356 N/A

3. Bookmobile BAKER COUNTY LIBRARY DISTRICT BOOKMOBILE
2400 Resort St, Baker City, OR 97814
Phone Number: (541) 523-6419 Baker N/A N/A

4. Branch Library HAINES BRANCH LIBRARY
Street Address: 45794 Quail Lane, Haines, OR 97833
Phone Number: (541) 856-3309 Baker N/A N/A

5. Branch Library HALFWAY BRANCH LIBRARY
Street Address: 260 Gover Lane, Halfway, OR 97834
Phone Number: (541) 742-5279 Baker N/A N/A

6. Branch Library HUNTINGTON BRANCH LIBRARY
Street Address: 55 E. Jefferson, Huntington, OR 97907
Phone Number: (541) 869-2202 Baker N/A N/A

7. Branch Library RICHLAND BRANCH LIBRARY
Street Address: 37986 Hwy 86, Richland, OR 97870
Phone Number: (541) 893-6088 Baker N/A N/A

Overview of Baker County, Oregon

Baker County is a county located in the state of Oregon. The county was named for Edward Dickinson Baker, a senator from Oregon who was killed at Balls Bluff, a battle of the American Civil War. It was split from the eastern part of Wasco County. As of 2000, the population is 16,741.

Economy

Gold mining was the original impetus for settlement in the area, and at one time the county was the largest gold producer in the Northwest. With the exhaustion of the gold fields, agriculture, stock raising, logging became the primary economic pursuits. In the last decades of the 20th century, tourism also contributed to the local economy, helped by attractions that include the Eagle Cap Wilderness Area, the Hells Canyon Recreation Area, and Anthony Lakes Ski Resort. The National Historic Oregon Trail Interpretative Center has drawn numerous visitors since its opening in 1993.

History

The first groups from the eastern United States interested in settling in Oregon only paused in the area on their way to the Willamette Valley, unaware of the potential wealth they passed over. At Flagstaff Hill, near Baker City, 15 miles of wagon ruts left by immigrants can still be seen.

In 1861 gold was discovered and Baker County became one of the Northwest’s largest gold producers. The Blue Bucket Mine, a mythical rich vein of gold, is part of the folklore from this period.

On September 22 of the following year, the state legislature created Baker County from the eastern part of Wasco County. Later, Union County and Malheur County were created from this county. The boundaries were adjusted for the last time in 1901 when the area between the Powder River and the Wallowa Mountains was returned to Baker County.

The original county seat was at Auburn. While at first a booming mining town with 5,000 inhabitants, once the gold was mined out Auburn’s population dwindled, and county citizens eventually voted in 1868 to make Baker City, incorporated in 1874, the new county seat.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 7,999 km² (3,088 mi²). 7,946 km² (3,068 mi²) of it is land and 53 km² (20 mi²) of it is water. The total area is 0.66% water.

Adjacent Counties

  • Union County, Oregon- (north 1)
  • Wallowa County, Oregon- (north 2)
  • Wasco County, Oregon- (west)
  • Malheur County, Oregon- (south)

Demographics

As of the census of 2000, there are 16,741 people, 6,883 households, and 4,680 families residing in the county. The population density is 2/km² (6/mi²). There are 8,402 housing units at an average density of 1/km² (3/mi²). The racial makeup of the county is 95.68% White, 0.23% Black or African American, 1.09% Native American, 0.38% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 0.92% from other races, and 1.65% from two or more races. 2.34% of the population are Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There are 6,883 households out of which 28.00% have children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.20% are married couples living together, 8.60% have a female householder with no husband present, and 32.00% are non-families. 27.80% of all households are made up of individuals and 13.40% have someone living alone who is 65 years of age or older. The average household size is 2.37 and the average family size is 2.87.

In the county, the population is spread out with 24.20% under the age of 18, 5.80% from 18 to 24, 23.60% from 25 to 44, 27.30% from 45 to 64, and 19.00% who are 65 years of age or older. The median age is 43 years. For every 100 females there are 98.10 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there are 95.30 males.

The median income for a household in the county is $30,367, and the median income for a family is $36,106. Males have a median income of $27,133 versus $20,480 for females. The per capita income for the county is $15,612. 14.70% of the population and 10.10% of families are below the poverty line. Out of the total population, 18.80% of those under the age of 18 and 12.40% of those 65 and older are living below the poverty line.

Cities and towns

According to countryaah, Baker County, Oregon has the following cities and towns:

  • Auburn
  • Baker City
  • Copperfield
  • Greenhorn
  • Haines
  • Halfway
  • Huntington
  • Oxbow
  • Richland
  • Sumpter
  • Unity