Swaziland Population, Politics and Economy

Swaziland Population, Politics and Economy

Population in Eswatini (Swaziland)

Over 90 percent of Eswatini’s population of over a million people belong to the Swazi Bantu people. Further ethnicities are the Bantu tribes Sotho, Zulu and Tsonga as well as white Europeans and colored hybrids, so-called coloreds.

With a growth rate of only 1 percent per year, Eswatini’s population growth is among the lowest in Africa due to lower fertility, high AIDS mortality and emigration.

According to directoryaah, SiSwati, a Nguni language, which is also the official language in Eswatini, is learned as the mother tongue almost everywhere. Only a few residents speak IsiZulu or Xitsonga as their first language. In addition, English is the language of education and the second official language in Eswatini. Therefore, on a trip through Eswatini, sufficient communication in English is possible.

Politics and economy in Eswatini (Swaziland)

Swaziland is an absolute monarchy in which the king plays a dominant role in politics and enjoys immunity from the courts as the head of the executive, legislative and judicial branches. In addition, he elects the prime minister, who heads a cabinet. The regional administrators of the four administrative districts of Eswatinis and the regional council are also appointed by the king. The deputy head of state is the king’s mother, the Ndlovukati, who can also be specified if necessary.

The parliament consists of two chambers, the Senate with a maximum of 31 members and the House of Assembly with up to 76 members. The status of political parties is unclear. A new constitution has been in force since 2005, confirming the absolute rights of the king and still not allowing any parties to participate in elections. Eswatini’s political system is assessed as not being free.

Swaziland Politics

According to ebizdir, Eswatini is one of the poorest countries in the world and is a country in which a large part of the population (over) lives on less than one euro per day and around a fifth of the population is dependent on food aid from international organizations. The nonetheless existing prosperity is very unequal with a GDP of approx. 9,000 US dollars per resident, which is above average for Africa and is only distributed among the ruling classes of the population. 60% of the population live from farming for their own needs. The main agricultural products include sugar cane, peanuts, millet, citrus fruits, rice, tobacco, corn and cotton. Livestock is raised with cattle, sheep and goats. Today only diamonds, coal and kaolin are mined in terms of natural resources, after the demand for asbestos fell sharply and the iron ore deposits were depleted. Eswatini’s economy is heavily dependent on South Africa, from which 90 percent of all imports come and half of all exports are taken up. According to estimates, the share of the gross domestic product of the African headquarters of Coca-Cola, which moved to Swaziland in the 1980s because of the apartheid policy of South Africa, is around 40 percent. Eswatini’s small economy is growing by just 0.2% per year. The unemployment rate is around 28%. According to estimates, the share of the gross domestic product of the African headquarters of Coca-Cola, which moved to Swaziland in the 1980s because of the apartheid policy of South Africa, is around 40 percent. Eswatini’s small economy is growing by just 0.2% per year. The unemployment rate is around 28%. According to estimates, the share of the gross domestic product of the African headquarters of Coca-Cola, which moved to Swaziland in the 1980s because of the apartheid policy of South Africa, is around 40 percent. Eswatini’s small economy is growing by just 0.2% per year. The unemployment rate is around 28%.

Transport network in Eswatini (Swaziland)

Eswatini has a relatively well developed road network of approx. 3600 km in length (2002). Of these, approx. 1000 km are asphalted main connecting roads, while the secondary routes run over mostly well-groomed slopes. In the high mountains or in swampy areas, however, some of these roads are slow to drive. In Eswatini, as in neighboring South Africa, there is left-hand traffic. Due to the many sources of danger such as unlit vehicles, wild animals and wagons, night drives in Eswatini are not advisable. In many places public transport is handled by taxis and minibuses.

Rail traffic on the 300 km long route network in Eswatini is used exclusively for freight traffic. Eswatini is connected to its two neighboring countries, South Africa and Mozambique, via a west-east route and a north-south route.

The country’s only international airport is the new King Mswati III airport near Mpaka, around 70 kilometers east of the capital Mbabane and around 45 kilometers from the economic center of Manzini.